International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

Mediating and perspective-taking manipulatives: Fostering dynamic perspective-taking by mediating dialogic thinking and bolstering empathy in role-play and reflection for microteaching

2 months ago
Abstract

This study examined microteaching using computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) to assist student teachers in anticipating student voices and achieving authentic role-play. To achieve this, the design had two manipulatives: tangible puppets as “mediating manipulatives” that allow student teachers to elicit a variety of imaginary student voices in microteaching role-plays and three-dimensional animations as “perspective-taking manipulatives” that allow student teachers to dynamically switch viewpoints in reflection. This study aims to investigate how the combination of mediating and perspective-taking manipulatives helps student teachers foster the perspective-taking of imaginary students in their microteaching role-playing and reflection. We employed epistemic network analysis (ENA) to analyze discourse data collected both in the microteaching performances (including the tangible puppetry microteaching) and in the reflections. The results showed that the combination of the two manipulatives was effective for achieving the immediate transfer of imaginary students’ perspectives. Further qualitative analysis enabled by ENA indicated that the perspective-taking manipulatives were effective in bolstering perspective-taking due to the nonverbal aspects of students’ voices enacted in the role-play performances.

Evolution of the academic emotions of academically low-achieving students in knowledge building

2 months ago
Abstract

Knowledge Building is a pedagogical approach that emphasizes students’ collective responsibility to continuously improve their community knowledge. Advancing the frontiers of community knowledge is an exciting but challenging process, especially for low-achieving students, because it involves a continuous experience of cognitive disequilibrium and equilibrium. This knowledge generation process triggers various emotions (e.g., curiosity, surprise, and confusion) that may promote or hinder Knowledge Building. This study investigated the types and evolution of emotions experienced by academically low-achieving students in the Knowledge Building process supported by Knowledge Forum. The participants were 120 students from two Grade 9 classes and two Grade 11 classes in a Band 3 secondary school in Hong Kong. This school enrolls students performing at the 10th percentile on a pre-admission government examination at the end of elementary school. The participants built knowledge around Visual Arts. The emotions reflected in the digital Knowledge Forum notes and the evolution patterns of emotions in inquiry threads were both analyzed using content analysis and sequential pattern analysis. The participants demonstrated a high percentage of joy and relatively low percentages of frustration and boredom. Emotions were likely to maintain consistency (e.g., joy to joy) or transition between similar emotions (e.g., boredom to frustration) in the inquiry threads. By synthesizing the emotion transitions and subsequences manifested in the inquiry threads of different classes, we constructed a model of the evolution of emotions of academically low-achieving students during Knowledge Building. This model has implications for designing scaffolding or interventions to facilitate low-achieving students' learning and promote favorable emotions.

The impact of scripts on blended and online socially shared regulation of learning: A role-playing game theory perspective

2 months ago
Abstract

Self-regulated learning theory is central to computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) and depends on learner autonomy to create socially shared learning, and yet function within the restraints and goals of a specific class pedagogy. By integrating the rich theoretical CSCL literature with an inductively derived theory of role-playing game practice, we develop an insightful foundation for designing, implementing, and measuring the effectiveness of low-cost scripts. This takes the form of a prompt (mere exposure prompt) that nudges learners toward a pedagogical goal while maintaining freedom of learner creativity and minimizing instructor intrusion. We assert learner engagement can be viewed through the lens of role-playing’s emphasis on aligning players’ creative agendas with game design to create a shared imagined space. Through behavioral trace data and social network analysis, we measure behaviors that differ between test/control groups, receiving the prompt, and comparing a fully online versus blended course delivery over a semester of group-based simulated business negations following role-playing game design principles. Fully online test group members accurately recall the prompt’s messages while exhibiting behaviors congruent with the pedagogical script. Learners in the blended mode recall the prompt, but their behavior is unchanged. This suggests socially shared regulation of learning in the classroom context conforms to established classroom norms, overlooking the script prompt. Learners in the fully online mode, in contrast, initiate fewer social interactions, but search out opportunities across many players, thereby demonstrating the effect of the script prompt message.

Emotion expression and recognition in written digital discussions on Civic Issues

2 months ago
Abstract

This study examines emotion regulation strategies in written digital discussions revolving around controversial issues. Twenty-five undergraduate students, placed in five study groups, took part in written digital discussions. Two groups were chosen to participate in the study. Participants were interviewed and were asked to read the transcript of the digital conversation they took part in, while referring to all conversation turns. They were asked to explain their own, as well as others’ reasoning regarding emotion expression and emotion intensity levels. Ninety-three interpretations of participants’ turns were made during the interviews. We compared the ways composers labeled their own emotions and intensity levels, with the ways in which other participants’ recognize these emotions, in order to assess the correlations between them. We report on several emotion recognition strategies that were found and point to the idiosyncratically rich but lacking in common ground nature of emotional social language. We highlight the gaps between composers' emotion labeling and others’ emotion recognition. The study offers new insight regarding emotional communication in CSCL settings, claiming that despite poor correlation rates and lack of shared emotional language, participants were indeed able to communicate emotionally. In CSCL settings, emotions function as a dialogic instrument enabling people to relate to each other by fostering closeness and establishing relations.