International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

Implementing learning analytics in wiki-supported collaborative learning in secondary education: A framework-motivated empirical study

3 weeks 4 days ago
Abstract

Learning analytics (LA) and group awareness tools are regarded as top priorities for research in the field of computer-supported collaborative learning. As such, this study investigated whether LA-enabled group awareness information facilitates wiki-supported collaborative learning in secondary education. We proposed an analytic framework of measures for assessing collaboration quality in a wiki-based collaborative learning environment, covering student contribution, participation, transactivity, and social dynamics. Based on this framework, we designed an LA-enabled group awareness tool, Wikiglass, for use by both teachers and students in K-12 schools for visualizing statistics of students’ input and interactions on wikis at the class, group, and individual levels. Adopting a naturalistic design, this study allowed teachers and students to decide whether and how often to use the tool. System logs from wikis and Wikiglass and interview data were collected from 440 students and six teachers involved in semester-long wiki-supported group inquiry projects in a secondary school. Regression analyses of quantitative data and thematic content analysis of interview responses showed relationships between the frequencies of teachers’ and students’ use of Wikiglass and measures of students’ collaboration quality at both the individual and group levels. These results indicate that teachers’ scaffolding, students’ collaboration styles, and ethical issues must all be considered when implementing collaborative learning approaches for secondary education. We also discuss the implications of our results for research and practice in the application of LA and group awareness tools for enhancing wiki-supported collaborative learning in K-12 education.

Shared meaning-making in online intergroup discussions around sensitive topics

3 weeks 4 days ago
Abstract

Shared meaning-making across differences in today’s polarized society requires a socio-political perspective toward conceptualizing and operationalizing collaborative competence. Thus, there is a pressing need for socio-political pedagogies and designs in CSCL to empower students as cultural-historical agents who can communicate and work effectively across different communities. As the initial steps of our larger efforts to conceptualize and operationalize a model of multicultural collaborative competence (MCC), we explore communication patterns associated with productive and dysfunctional shared meaning-making around difficult topics related to identity (e.g., race, gender) during intergroup dialogues in a CSCL context. We also examine how our preexisting, general model of collaborative competence (GCC) aligns with these communication patterns to explore (1) whether GCC is robust enough to capture the socio-political dynamics of difficult dialogues and (2) the ways in which we could modify it to better address the tensions between GCC and MCC goals. We collected the discussion transcripts of four three-person teams over two-time points from an undergraduate Multicultural Psychology course. We first conducted thematic and cross-case analyses to identify the communication patterns and behaviors associated with productive and dysfunctional shared meaning-making processes in the context of difficult dialogues (i.e., MCC). We then employed another set of cross-case analyses to examine the relationship between the multicultural collaborative competencies (MCC) and general collaborative competencies (GCC). We found four main communication patterns associated with MCC: (1) grounding with narratives and aims, (2) exploring differences and commonalities of narratives/perspectives, (3) critical reflection of diverse narratives/perspectives, and (4) providing emotional support to team members. We also found that although the GCC does not cover these communication patterns and associated behaviors, there were some overlaps between the sophistication of multiculturally competent communication patterns and collaboration quality as defined by the GCC.

Fostering growth orientations in students’ identities as knowledge builders

3 weeks 5 days ago
Abstract

Fast-moving changes to society as part of the digital age are posing new educational challenges that require students to be flexible, adaptive, and growth-oriented. Humanistic knowledge building communities (HKBCs) are a growth promoting pedagogy, suitable to address these challenges. Yet, the way that students’ identities as knowledge builders are transformed remains undertheorized. In this study, we rise above existing frameworks of fixedness versus fluidity to elucidate how students develop growth orientations. Using a grounded approach, we examined a graduate course, coding 322 relevant utterances that were expressed by the course participants over the semester. This resulted in a five dimensional framework of fixedness versus growth that was used to describe the personal transformation of students within the HKBC. The changes that students made over time were shown to occur at statistically significant levels. This study suggests that learning communities should focus on the complementary nature of collective idea-advancement and personal growth promotion if they are to address the challenges of preparing students for life in a rapidly changing world.

iTalk–iSee: A participatory visual learning analytical tool for productive peer talk

1 month ago
Abstract

Productive peer talk moves have a fundamental role in structuring group discussions and promoting peer interactions. However, there is a lack of comprehensive technical support for developing young learners’ skills in using productive peer talk moves. To address this, we designed iTalk–iSee, a participatory visual learning analytical tool that supports students’ learning and their use of productive peer talk moves in dialogic collaborative problem-solving (DCPS). This paper discusses aspects of the design of iTalk–iSee, including its underlying theoretical framework, visualization, and the learner agency it affords. Informed by the theory of Bakhtinian dialogism, iTalk–iSee maps productive peer talk moves onto learning goals in DCPS. It applies well-established visualization design principles to connect with students, hold and direct their attention, and enhance their understanding. It also follows a three-step (code → visualize → reflect) macro-script to strengthen students’ agency in analyzing and interpreting their talk. This paper also discusses the progressive modifications of iTalk–iSee and evaluates its usability in a field study. We present the implications of essential design features of iTalk–iSee and the challenges of using it (relating to, for example, teacher guidance, data collection, transcription, and coding). We also provide suggestions and directions for future research.